Concussion Symptom Inventory: An Empirically Derived Scale for Monitoring Resolution of Symptoms Following Sport-Related Concussion

Citation:  Randolph, C., Millis S., Barr, W. B., McCrea, M., Guskiewicz, K. M., Hammeke, T. A., & Kelly, J. P. (2009). Concussion Symptom Inventory: An Empirically Derived Scale for Monitoring Resolution of Symptoms Following Sport-Related Concussion. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 24, 219-229.

Review by Matt Holcomb, PhD

The present article is based on the combination of the data derived from 3 case-controlled studies which used the Concussion Symptom Inventory (CSI).  The aim was to identify which inventory items were more relevant in detecting and tracking sport-related concussions.  As the authors point out, the literature on concussions is filled with empirically derived controlled outcome studies, which has led to confusion on best practices in classifying concussions and determining return-to-play.  This study resulted in an empirically derived CSI.   Twelve items were found to adequately discriminate concussed from non-concussed, resulting in a much more brief inventory (from 20-27 items).  This study is an important step in formalizing standards and practices for evaluating concussions.  As with most scale development the study lacks independent verification, and further development of cut-off scores which could aid the process of concussion identification.  Read more

Alteration of Brain Default Network in Subacute Phase of Injury in Concussed Individuals: Resting-State fMRI Study

Reviews by Brad Tyson, PHD

This article looks at resting-state fMRI to evaluate the default mode network in two groups of participants: 15 neurologically normal collegiate athletes with no history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and 14 collegiate who recently suffered a sports-related mTBI. Scanning in the mTBI group took place within 24 hours of clinical symptoms resolution and medical clearance for the first stage of aerobic activity by their supervising physician, which was 10 (+/-2) days post-injury on average. A third group of nine collegiate athletes with multiple mTBIs that were not scanned within 24 hours of symptom resolution, but nonetheless scanned in 10 (+/-4) days post-injury on average, were included in an exploratory regression analysis. Results demonstrated a higher than average connection strength in the controls when compared to the mTBI group and a downward trend in the number of connections as the number of mTBIs increased. Read more

TGen and Riddell Announce Partnership for Biomarker Study of Concussive Injuries

TGen and Riddell Announce Partnership for Biomarker Study of Concussive Injuries

Riddell’s Sideline Response System to provide real-time head impact data on athletes, combined with TGen’s molecular clues from players with concussions to unlock keys to monitoring of head injury

Head protection plays a vital role in the health and safety of any athlete participating in helmeted sports. In a move that could help revolutionize football player safety, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), and Easton-Bell Sports through its Riddell brand, announced today they would work together on a study designed to advance athlete concussion detection and treatment. Information gathered through the study will also be used to develop new football headgear and further refine updates to player monitoring technology.  Read more