Extensive Study on Concussions in Youth Sports Finds ‘Culture of Resistance’ for Self-Reporting Injury; Not Enough Evidence to Support Claim That Helmets Reduce Concussion Risk

WASHINGTON — Young athletes in the U.S. face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports — including football, men’s lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and women’s basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.  See full press release

Dorsett, others reveal CTE symptoms

Hall of Famer Tony Dorsett confirmed he has been diagnosed with signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the degenerative brain disease that has been linked to concussions and the suicides of former football players.

Dorsett’s condition was revealed by doctors on ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” on Wednesday, as were the diagnoses of fellow Hall of Famer Joe DeLamielleure and former All-Pro Leonard Marshall. Dorsett called in to ESPN’s “Dan LeBatard Is Highly Questionable” show and talked about what he’s going through, saying “My quality of living has changed drastically and it deteriorates every day.” Read article

Baseline neurocognitive scores in athletes with attention deficit spectrum disorders and/or learning disability.

Reviewed by Erin Almklov, PhD
The article titled “Baseline neurocognitive scores in athletes with attention deficit spectrum disorders and/or learning disability” is a retrospective study that aimed to examine baseline neurocognitive differences between athletes with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or learning disability (LD) versus those with neither disorder and to establish normative data for these populations.  Read more

A Wearable Alert to Head Injuries in Sports

HARD knocks to the head are a constant concern in contact sports — and not just in football or boxing, where recent attention has focused. Millions of girls and boys play hockey, soccer, lacrosse and other sports where blows to the head from collisions and falls are part of the game, even in youth leagues and on high school teams.

Head injuries can come from a single jarring impact during a game, or from a series of smaller jolts. But in the midst of play, many blows aren’t necessarily easy to spot by coaches, physicians or parents in attendance.

A crop of new lightweight devices that athletes can wear on the field may help people on sidelines keep better track of hits to players’ heads during games and practice sessions. The devices, packed with sensors and microprocessors, register a blow to a player’s skull and immediately signal the news by blinking brightly, or by sending a wireless alert.     Read more

TGen and Riddell Announce Partnership for Biomarker Study of Concussive Injuries

TGen and Riddell Announce Partnership for Biomarker Study of Concussive Injuries

Riddell’s Sideline Response System to provide real-time head impact data on athletes, combined with TGen’s molecular clues from players with concussions to unlock keys to monitoring of head injury

Head protection plays a vital role in the health and safety of any athlete participating in helmeted sports. In a move that could help revolutionize football player safety, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), and Easton-Bell Sports through its Riddell brand, announced today they would work together on a study designed to advance athlete concussion detection and treatment. Information gathered through the study will also be used to develop new football headgear and further refine updates to player monitoring technology.  Read more

 

NFL: PET Scan IDs Brain Damage in Players

By Nancy Walsh, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Published: January 22, 2013
Reviewed by F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE; Instructor of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner
A new imaging technique has allowed detection of tau protein abnormalities in the concussed brains of living retired football players that are identical to the autopsy findings of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in deceased athletes, researchers reported.

See article